Criteria Google uses to determines if your website is ‘quality’

By | August 2, 2014

If your company has a website (which of course it should), one of your goals should be receiving organic traffic through an internet search by a user interested in your specific product or service!

And of course the number one goal, the mother-load of organic search, is to appear on Page 1 of the results!

Google uses a complex algorithm to determine how various websites stack up against each other and the order in which they will appear in a search.

Unfortunately, this algorithm changes over time and with little or no notice resulting in websites suddenly moving up and down in the rankings for no apparent reason that the owners can understand.

Welcome to the world of internet marketing.

This past May Panda 4.0 was released with the typical impact on internet users everywhere so we thought it might be helpful to provide a broad outline of what it is that Google is looking for in a website.

Google, website quality and algorithms!

From the horses mouth (Google blog 2011), this is an idea of Google’s method of evaluation:

If you want to step into Google’s mindset, the questions below provide some guidance on how we’ve been looking at the issue:

 

  • Would you trust the information presented in this article?
  • Is this article written by an expert or enthusiast who knows the topic well, or is it more shallow in nature?
  • Does the site have duplicate, overlapping, or redundant articles on the same or similar topics with slightly different keyword variations?
  • Would you be comfortable giving your credit card information to this site?
  • Does this article have spelling, stylistic, or factual errors?
  • Are the topics driven by genuine interests of readers of the site, or does the site generate content by attempting to guess what might rank well in search engines?
  • Does the article provide original content or information, original reporting, original research, or original analysis?
  • Does the page provide substantial value when compared to other pages in search results?
  • How much quality control is done on content?
  • Does the article describe both sides of a story?
  • Is the site a recognized authority on its topic?
  • Is the content mass-produced by or outsourced to a large number of creators, or spread across a large network of sites, so that individual pages or sites don’t get as much attention or care?
  • Was the article edited well, or does it appear sloppy or hastily produced?
  • For a health related query, would you trust information from this site?
  • Would you recognize this site as an authoritative source when mentioned by name?
  • Does this article provide a complete or comprehensive description of the topic?
  • Does this article contain insightful analysis or interesting information that is beyond obvious?
  • Is this the sort of page you’d want to bookmark, share with a friend, or recommend?
  • Does this article have an excessive amount of ads that distract from or interfere with the main content?
  • Would you expect to see this article in a printed magazine, encyclopedia or book?
  • Are the articles short, unsubstantial, or otherwise lacking in helpful specifics?
  • Are the pages produced with great care and attention to detail vs. less attention to detail?
  • Would users complain when they see pages from this site?

 

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Written by Michael Haltman, President of Hallmark Abstract Service, New York.

HAS is a provider of title insurance in New York State for residential and commercial real estate transactions specializing in the areas of New York City, Long Island and Westchester.

Remember that you have the right to choose your own title company (click here to learn more)!

If you have any questions you can reach Michael by email at mhaltman@hallmarkabstractllc.com.

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